Activities in

Correspondence Chess

Stephan Busemann

CC Grandmaster

ICCF Elo 2592


Stephan Busemann started correspondence chess in 1975 in the lowest class of BdF double round robin tmts. He has finished about 300 tournament games since, and scored over 70% of the possible points.

In 1996, he earned the ICCF Grandmaster title and has achieved seven more GM norms since. In team tournaments, he won a German, a European, and three World Championships ("Olympiads" 12, 14, and 17). In single tournaments, he has achieved outstanding results in strong invitational tournaments, most prominently the bronze medal in the 21st World Championship Final and shared victory in the Witold Bielecky Memorial, the strongest single-round invitational tournament ever. According to his ICCF Elo rating, Stephan Busemann counts among the top 40 players worldwide.

Due to business duties and other interests, he usually plays no more than 15 games at a time. 

Below is a summary of his major correspondence chess achievements and activities.

Year

Tournament

Team Result (if applicable)

Individual Result

Title Norm

1981

1st German Junior Championship

 

Third, 7 / 10 points

 

1982

9th German Cup (final)

 

Second, 7 / 10 points

 

1986

4th German Junior Championship

 

German Junior Champion 1982-86, 11½ / 12 points

 

1987

3rd European Team Championship (preliminaries) Board 10

First (FR Germany I)

First, 6½ / 8 points

IM half

1989

1st Danube Team tmt Board 4

Third (FR Germany)

First, 5 / 7 points

IM half

1989

 

 

Correspondence Chess International Master

 

1990

5th Baltic Sea Team tmt Board 3

First (FR Germany I)

Fifth, 10 / 15 points

 

1992

3rd European Team Championship (final) Board 7

European Team Champion
(Germany)

Second, 6 / 8 points

IM

1993

ICCF World Cup V (final A)

 

Sixth, 6 / 11 points

 

1995

1st German Team Cup (final) Board 1

German Team Cup Winner
(SC Kreuzberg Berlin, see photo)

Second, 7½ / 10 points

 

1996

SSKK Bulletinen 40 years, Invitational, cat. XII

 

Second, 10 / 14 points

GM (8½ pts)

1996

 

 

Correspondence Chess Grandmaster

 

1999

German Bundesliga, Board 1

German Team Champion 1997/99
(SC Kreuzberg Berlin, see photo)

Second, 5½ / 8 points

 

2001

12th Olympiad (final) Board 5, postal, cat VIII

World Team Champion
(Germany), see photo

First, 8½ / 11 points

GM (8 pts)

2002

14th Olympiad (= 1st E-mail Olympiad) Section 4, Board 2, cat VII

First (Germany)

First, 8½ / 11 points

GM (8½ pts)

2003

20th World Championship, ¾ final, Section 1, email, cat. XI

 

Third, 9 / 13 points; qualified for a World Championship final

GM (8½ pts)

2005

14th Olympiad (final) Board 3, email, cat. XI

World Team Champion
(Germany) – we did it again! See photo

Fifth, 6½ / 11 points

 

2006

Dansk Skak Union 100 years - A, email Invitational, cat. XIII

 

Second, 7½ / 12 points

GM  (7 pts)

2007

World Championship 21 Final, email, cat. XIV

Bronze medal, 8 / 14 points

GM  (7½ pts)

2010
Hermann-Heemsoth-Memorial, email Invitational, cat. XVI
 
Twelfth, 7½ / 16 points

GM  (7½ pts)

2011 17th Olympiad (final) Board 4, Server, cat. X World Team Champion
(Germany) - for the third time!
Third, 7 / 12 points   
2012 30th World Championship, Candidates, Section 7, Server, cat. XI   First, 5½ / 10 points; qualified for a World Championship final  
2013 Witold-Bielecki-Memorial, Server Invitational, cat. XVI   First, 7½ / 12 points (co-winner). Tournament page  GM (6 pts)
2014 Champions League 2012 A Board 1, Server, cat XII 6th (The Underdogs I) Nineth, 5½ points out of 12 games
2016 9th European Team Championship (final) Board 2, Server, cat XII 5th (Germany) 5½ points out of 12 games
World Championship 29 Final, Server, cat XIII 4½ points out of 9 games, 7 games ongoing
20th Olympiad (final) Board 3, Server, cat XI Germany 12 games ongoing

Some brief explanations: Tournament describes the activity, Year its completion. Tournaments may have a category, which is a measure for the nominal strength of the tournament. Category XI is a really strong tournament, XIV is world championship level, and anything beyond that is very rare. Categories are based on the average Elo numbers of the participants. Elo numbers represent a player's nominal strength. For instance, Elo 2400 is master level, and 2500 is grandmaster level. As every game is evaluated, Elo numbers include to some extent all recent successes and failures, which is why there are masters at 2500 and grandmasters at 2400, too.

 In a team event, each team player is assigned a board. Usually board numbers reflect the strength of the players within the team (the strongest player is on board 1). Each player plays against the same board of all opponent teams. Thus separate tournaments for each board are played, but they are counted together to form the Team Result. Individual Result describes the result achieved in either a single or a team event.

Title Norm shows norms achieved. Norms depend on the category and number of players in a tournament, among other things. Earning many Grandmaster (GM) norms demonstrates high class results over a longer period.


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Last changed on October 18, 2016 

Stephan Busemann (busemann at dfki.de)