German Conference on Artificial Intelligence

The applications of Artificial Intelligence are abundant and widespread. In fact, Artificial Intelligence has become such a mainstay in today's world that it is taken for granted by the majority of people who benefit from it.

The conference invites original research papers from all areas of AI, its fundamentals, its algorithms, its history, and its applications. The conference proceedings will be made available by Springer. Please use the LNCSstyle for submissions.

The KI 2012 conference is over. Thanks for your participation!

The picture gallery is available here.

KI 2013 will take place in Koblenz, Germany. We look forward to seeing you there!


Full Program

Program at a glance: Download PDF

Program Booklet: Download PDF

Online Access for Proceedings

Online access for LNCS 7526 - KI 2012 - is provided via society token activation: Download PDF

Invited Speakers

Ian Horrocks

from the University of Oxford, UK

Semantics ⊓ Scalability |= ⊥ ?

So called "Semantic Technologies" are rapidly becoming mainstream technologies, with RDF and OWL now being deployed in diverse application domains, and with major technology vendors starting to augment their existing systems accordingly. For example, Oracle Inc. recently enhanced its well-known database management system with modules that use RDF/OWL ontologies to support "semantic data management", and their product brochure lists numerous application areas that can benefit from this technology, including Enterprise Information Integration, Knowledge Mining, Finance, Compliance Management and Life Science Research. This is, however, only the first step for Semantic Web research; we need to demonstrate that the Semantic Technologies we are developing can (be made to) exhibit robust scalability if deployments in large scale applications are to be successful. In this talk I will review the evolution of Semantic Technologies to date, and show how research ideas from logic based knowledge representation developed into a mainstream technology. I will then go on to examine the scalability challenges arising from deployment in large scale applications, and discuss ongoing research aimed at addressing them.

Ian Horrocks is a Professor in the Oxford University Department of Computer Science and is a Fellow of Oriel College Oxford. His research interests include logic-based knowledge representation and reasoning and the semantic web, with a particular focus on ontology languages and applications. He was one of the key authors of the OIL, DAML+OIL, and OWL ontology language standards, chaired the W3C working group that standardised OWL 2, and developed many of the algorithms, optimisation techniques and reasoning systems that underpin OWL applications. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society, an ECCAI Fellow, and is amongst the most highly cited authors in Computer Science.
 

Tanja Schultz

from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Biosignals and Interfaces

Human communication relies on signals like speech, mimics, or gestures and the interpretation of these signals seems to be innate to humans. In contrast, human interaction with machines and thus human communication mediated /through/ machines is far from being natural. To date, it is restricted to few channels and the capabilities of machines to interpret human signals are still very limited.
At the Cognitive Systems Lab (CSL) we explore humancentered cognitive systems to improve human-machine interaction as well as machine-mediated human communication. We aim to make better use of the strength of machines by departing from just mimicking the human way of communication. Rather we focus on considering the full range of biosignals emitted from the human body, such as electrical biosignals like brain and muscle activity. These signals can be directly measured and interpreted by machines, leveraging emerging wearable, small and wireless sensor technologies. Using these biosignals offers an /inside perspective/ on human mental activities, intentions, or needs and thus complements the traditional way of observing humans from the outside.
In my talk I will discuss ongoing research on “Biosignals and Interfaces” at CSL, such as silent speech interfaces that rely on articulatory muscle movement, and interfaces that use brain activity to determine users’ mental states, such as task activity, cognitive workload, emotion, and personality. We hope that our research will lead to a new generation of human centered “anthropomatic” systems, which are completely aware of the users’ needs and provide intuitive, efficient, robust, and adaptive input mechanisms to interaction and communication.

Tanja Schultz joined Carnegie Mellon University in 2000 and became a Research Professor at the Language Technologies Institute. Since 2007 she is also a Full Professor at the Computer Science Department of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany. She is the director of the Cognitive Systems Lab, where her research activities focus on human-machine interfaces with a particular area of expertise in rapid adaptation of speech processing systems to new domains and languages. She co-edited a book on this subject and received several awards for this work. In 2001 she received the FZI price for an outstanding Ph.D. thesis. In 2002 she was awarded the Allen Newell Medal for Research Excellence from Carnegie Mellon for her contribution to Speech Translation and the ISCA best paper award for her publication on language independent acoustic modeling. In 2005 she received the Carnegie Mellon Language Technologies Institute Junior Faculty Chair. Her recent research focuses on human-centered technologies and intuitive human-machine interfaces based on biosignals, by capturing, processing, and interpreting signals such as muscle and brain activities.
 

Elisabeth André

from the University of Augsburg

Exploring the potential of social signal processing for human-machine interaction: Synergies and challenges

Societal challenges, such as assisted living for elderly people, create a high demand for technology able to emulate human-style interaction modes. Currently, most manmachine interfaces focus on input that is explicitly issued by the human users. However, often it is the myriad of unconsciously conveyed signals that will determine whether an interaction with a machine is successful or not. In my talk I will show how recent advances in the area of social signal processing can contribute to new forms of individual and collective experiences when interacting with technology. I will present a framework for social signal interpretation (SSI) that synchronizes and analyzes human behavior in real-time, such as body gestures, facial expressions, head nods, and emotional speech. In addition, I will demonstrate the potential of social signal interpretation technology as a tool to evaluate the experiences of humans interacting with a machine. The talk will be illustrated by examples from single and multi-user interactions with virtual characters and social robots.

Elisabeth André is a full professor of Computer Science at Augsburg University and Chair of the Research Unit for Human-Centered Multimedia. Prior to that, she worked as a principal researcher at DFKI GmbH where she has been leading various academic and industrial projects in the area of intelligent user interfaces. Elisabeth André holds a long track record in embodied conversational agents, multimodal interfaces and social signal processing. Elisabeth André is on the editorial board of various renowned international journals, such as Journal of Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems (JAAMAS), IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing (TAC), ACM Transactions on Intelligent Interactive Systems (TIIS), and AI Communications. In summer 2007 Elisabeth André was nominated Fellow of the Alcatel-Lucent Foundation for Communications Research. In 2010, she was elected a member of the prestigious German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the Academy of Europe and AcademiaNet.
 

Workshops

  1. 6th Workshop on “Emotion and Computing - Current Research and Future Impact”
    Dirk Reichardt
  2. AI on the Web
    Sebastian Rudolph, Heiner Stuckenschmidt and Matthias Thimm
  3. Human Reasoning and Automated Deduction
    Thomas Barkowsky, Marco Ragni and Frieder Stolzenburg
  4. Dialog systems that think along - do they really understand me?
    Frank Wallhoff, Bernd Schönebeck and Stefan Goetze

Tutorials

  1. "Region-based theories of space" Philippe Balbiani
  2. Designing Ambient Intelligence Environments
    Sabine Janzen and Wolfgang Maass
  3. The cognitive architecture ACT-R
    Marco Ragni, Rebecca Albrecht, and Stefano Bennati
  4. Object Memory Tools: Tailoring a Thing’s Data Collection and Communication Behavior
    Jens Haupert, Alexander Kröner and Boris Brandherm

Poster & Demo Track

Invited Project Contributions

Poster Contributions

Demo Contributions

Doctoral Consortium

The KI conference series traditionally brings together academic and industrial researchers from all areas of AI. The technical program of presentations, workshops, and tutorials is complemented by a doctoral consortium whose goals are
  • to provide PhD students with the opportunity to present their ongoing research and receive feedback from established researchers;
  • to promote networking among PhD students and AI researchers in general, both on a national and an international level;
  • to support students with advice on academic, research, and industrial careers.
  • The doctoral consortium is implemented as a student mentoring program and as a poster session which takes place on

    Wednesday, September 26, 16:00 - 17:00.

    The poster session is open to all KI2012 attendees, so please feel invited to drop by and meet the DC participants!

  • Claas Ahlrichs, Universität Bremen
    Development and Evaluation of AI-based Parkinson’s Disease Related Motor Symptom Detection Algorithms
  • Michael Baumann, Universität Paderborn
    Can Agents Learn to Control a Flock of Sheep?
  • Daniel Borchmann, TU Dresden
    Confident GCIs of Finite Interpretations
  • Emanuelle Dietz, TU Dresden
    Reasoning with Conditionals
  • Dagmar Lang, Universität Koblenz
    Semantic Mapping of Outdoor Environments
  • Danilo Saft, TU Ilmenau
    Nonlinear Dynamics, Swarm Behavior and Emergent Phenomena in the Socio-Economic Context
  • Claudia Schon, Universität Koblenz
    Processing Description Logic Knowledge Bases
  • Asmir Vodencarevic, Universität Paderborn
    Automatic Model Generation for Monitoring Process Plants
  • Mark Wernsdorfer, Universität Bamberg
    Functional Grounding of Symbolic Representations in Non-Markovian Reinforcing Environments
  • Best Paper Award

    The winner of the KI 2012 Best Paper Award is

    "PAC-Learning with General Class Noise Models,"
    Shahin Jabbari, Robert C. Holte, Sandra Zilles

    and the

    Best Poster and Demo Presentation Award

    goes to

    "Object Recognition with Multicopters,"
    Falk Schmidsberger and Frieder Stolzenburg.

    Congratulations!

    Call for Papers

    KI 2012 is the 35th edition of the German Conference on Artificial Intelligence, which traditionally brings together academic and industrial researchers from all areas of AI. The technical programme of KI 2012 will comprise paper and poster presentations and a variety of workshops and tutorials.

    KI 2012 will take place in Saarbrücken, Germany, September 24-27, 2012, and is a premier forum for exchanging news and research results on theory and applications of all aspects on AI.

    The conference invites significant, original, and previously unpublished research from all areas of AI, its fundamentals, its algorithms, its history, and its applications.

    Areas of interest include, but are not limited to

    • Knowledge Acquisition, Representation, Reasoning and Ontologies
    • Combinatorial Search, Configuration, Design and Deduction
    • Natural Language Processing, Statistical NLP, Semantics
    • Planning and Scheduling; Spatial and Temporal Reasoning
    • Reasoning under Uncertainty, Probabilistic Inferences
    • Non-Monotonic Reasoning and Default Logics
    • Constraint Satisfaction, Processing and Programming
    • Embodied AI: Robotics, Vision and Perception
    • Intelligent Information Retrieval, Semantic Search, Semantic Web
    • Evolutionary and Neural Computation
    • Machine Learning, Computational Learning Theory and Data-Mining
    • Distributed Problem Solving and Multi-Agent Systems
    • Game Playing and Interactive Entertainment, AI for Graphics
    • Game Theory and General Game Playing, Generalized Intelligence
    • AI for Human-Computer-Interaction and Adaptive Communication
    • Mobile Solutions with Textile, Semantic and Spatial Media
    • Augmented Reality, Smart Cities, Smart Traffic, Smart Hardware
    • Assistance Systems in Living and Working Environments
    • Software-Engineering, Model Checking and Security in AI
    • Distributed Computation and Swarm Intelligence
    • Artificial General Intelligence
    • Cognitive Modelling, AI and Psychology
    • History and Philosophical Foundations of AI
    • Applications including Logistics, Production and Health Care

    We especially welcome application papers and posters providing novel insights on the interplay of AI and the real world, as well as papers that bring useful computational technologies from other areas of computer science into AI.


    Submission Guidelines

    Submitted papers, which have to be in English, must not exceed 12 pages in Springer LNCS style for full technical contributions and 4 pages for short contributions.

    Full technical papers are expected to report on new research that makes a substantial technical contribution to the field.

    Short papers can report on new research or other issues of interest to the AI community. Examples of work suitable for short papers include: novel ideas that are not yet fully developed or whose scope is not large enough for a full paper. important implementation techniques; novel interesting benchmark problems; short experimental studies; interesting applications that are not yet completely solved or analyzed; position or challenge papers; etc.

    Conference submission is electronic in PDF via EasyChair:

    http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ki2012

    Papers will be subject to blind peer review. All papers will be reviewed based on the standard criteria of relevance, significance of results, originality of ideas, soundness, and quality of the presentation.

    All accepted papers will be published in the main conference proceedings, and will be presented at the conference. At least one author of each accepted paper must register for the conference and present the contribution.

    Call for Posters and Demos

    KI 2012 is the 35th edition of the German Conference on Artificial Intelligence, which traditionally brings together academic and industrial researchers from all areas of AI. The technical programme of KI 2012 will comprise paper and poster presentations and a variety of workshops and tutorials.

    KI 2012 will take place in Saarbrücken, Germany, September 24-27, 2012, and is a premier forum for exchanging news and research results on theory and applications of all aspects on AI.

    The conference invites significant, original, and previously unpublished research from all areas of AI, its fundamentals, its algorithms, its history, and its applications.

    Areas of interest include, but are not limited to

    • Knowledge Acquisition, Representation, Reasoning and Ontologies
    • Combinatorial Search, Configuration, Design and Deduction
    • Natural Language Processing, Statistical NLP, Semantics
    • Planning and Scheduling; Spatial and Temporal Reasoning
    • Reasoning under Uncertainty, Probabilistic Inferences
    • Non-Monotonic Reasoning and Default Logics
    • Constraint Satisfaction, Processing and Programming
    • Embodied AI: Robotics, Vision and Perception
    • Intelligent Information Retrieval, Semantic Search, Semantic Web
    • Evolutionary and Neural Computation
    • Machine Learning, Computational Learning Theory and Data-Mining
    • Distributed Problem Solving and Multi-Agent Systems
    • Game Playing and Interactive Entertainment, AI for Graphics
    • Game Theory and General Game Playing, Generalized Intelligence
    • AI for Human-Computer-Interaction and Adaptive Communication
    • Mobile Solutions with Textile, Semantic and Spatial Media
    • Augmented Reality, Smart Cities, Smart Traffic, Smart Hardware
    • Assistance Systems in Living and Working Environments
    • Software-Engineering, Model Checking and Security in AI
    • Distributed Computation and Swarm Intelligence
    • Artificial General Intelligence
    • Cognitive Modelling, AI and Psychology
    • History and Philosophical Foundations of AI
    • Applications including Logistics, Production and Health Care

    We especially welcome poster and demo contributions providing novel insights on the interplay of AI and the real world, as well as contributions that bring useful computational technologies from other areas of computer science into AI.


    Submission Guidelines

    Submitted demo/poster papers, which have to be in English, must not exceed 3-4 pages in Springer LNCS style.

    Suitable topics for poster contributions include, but are not limited to: novel, but not yet fully developed ideas that are of interest for a broader AI audience; implementation techniques and novel interesting benchmark problems; experimental studies; real world applications of AI research; etc.

    Demo contributions should be system or tool descriptions that provide some background about the applied AI technologies. We particularly encourage demonstrations that show innovative AI techniques at work and allow for user interaction. Demo contributions may also be submitted by larger research groups as well as commercial organizations.

    Conference submission is electronic in PDF via EasyChair:

    http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ki2012

    Submitted poster and demo contributions will be subject to peer review, based on standard criteria such as relevance and significance, originality of ideas, technical soundness, and quality of presentation.

    Accepted poster/demo contributions will be distributed in electronic form at the conference site and count as refereed, but non-archival publication. At least one author of each accepted poster or demo must register for the conference and present the work during the poster and demo session at KI 2012. The poster and demo session will take place on September 25.

    Call for Workshop and Tutorial Proposals

    KI 2012, the 35th German Conference on Artificial Intelligence, invites workshop and tutorial proposals from all areas of AI, its fundamentals, its algorithms, and its applications.

    Together with the main conference, we plan to organize a small number of high-quality workshops and tutorials that any participant, whether graduate student or experienced researcher and practitioner, may attend.

    General Information

    Workshops will be free of charge for conference participants and will be held on the first day of the conference. We are interested in submissions of full-day (6 hours) and half-day (3 hours) workshops. They should preferably be given in English.
    Tutorials will be free of charge for conference participants and will be held at the first day of the conference. Tutorials will be free of charge for conference participants and will be held on the first day of the conference. We are soliciting proposals for full-day (6 hours) and half-day (3 hours) tutorials as well as mini-tutorials (1.5 hours) Tutorials should preferably be given in English.
    The KI 2012 conference organizers will provide logistic support and meeting rooms for the workshops and tutorials and will determine the dates and times of the workshops. Working and teaching material will be printed by the conference organization. Workshop volumes are limited to a total of 200 pages.

    How to Propose a Workshop

    Proposals should be prepared in PDF, or plain ASCII (two pages) and sent by email to the KI 2012 Workshop Chair. Each workshop proposal should provide the following information:

    • Description of workshop topic and goal. This description should discuss the relevance of the suggested topic and its interest to the general AI community and the KI 2012 audience.
    • Names and full addresses (including email and web address) of the workshop organizer(s). This can be a single person or a group of persons. Please indicate the primary contact person for the workshop to KI 2012. Strong proposals include organizers who bring differing perspectives to the workshop topic and who are actively connected to the communities of potential participants.
    • Names and affiliation of the members of the Program Committee.
    • For which areas of AI do you expect to draw participants for your workshop and how many participants do you expect? How do you plan to invite participants for the workshop?
    • A brief description of the workshop format regarding the mix of events such as paper presentation, invited talks, panels, demonstrations, and general discussion.
    • Do you expect the workshop to be a full-day workshop or a half-day workshop?
    • A list of important dates (submission deadline etc) for the workshop.

    Workshop organizers will be responsible for:

    • Producing a call for participation. This call will be posted on the KI 2012 website.
    • Organizers are responsible for additional publicity such as distributing the call to relevant newsgroups and electronic mailing lists, and especially to potential audiences from outside the KI conference community.
    • Submissions of the workshop papers will be handled by the workshop organizers. Please make sure that you have a proper review process.
    • Organizers are encouraged to maintain their own web site with updated information about the workshop.
    • Coordinating the production of the workshop notes. The workshop organizer coordinates the paper collection, production and distribution of the working notes for the workshops.

    How to Propose a Tutorial

    Tutorials should give a comprehensive, in-depth perspective on innovative AI methods or technologies that have an obvious potential for research and/or application and are not covered by typical AI textbooks. Proposals for tutorials should be submitted to the tutorial chair, Wolfgang Maass [wolfgang.maass@iss.uni-saarland.de]. Prior contact with the tutorial chair is encouraged.

    Proposal texts should be submitted by e-mail to the Tutorial Chair in pdf or plain text format. Annexes may be sent as .pdf, .ppt, or .doc format. Each tutorial proposal should provide the following information:

    • Descriptions of the tutorial topic, goals, the intended audience, an outline of the contents
    • Necessary information to point out the importance, quality and community interest in the proposed tutorial
    • Brief CVs of the tutor(s), including their expertise and teaching experience in the field and the intended length of the tutorial (half-day, full-day, or mini-tutorial).

    Proposers are encouraged to include excerpts of material from recent teaching about the proposed topic as an annex of their submission, if available.

    The organizer(s) of approved tutorials will be responsible for advertising their tutorial, e.g., via relevant newsgroups and electronic mailing lists, and especially to potential audiences from outside the KI conference community. Organizers are encouraged to maintain their own web site with updated information about the tutorial.

    Organizers (including co-organizers) are expected to attend their entire tutorial and to provide a summary of the event for presentation to the KI-2012 organisers.

    Submission Guidelines

    Submitted papers, which have to be in English, must not exceed 12 pages in Springer LNCS style for full technical contributions and 4 pages for short contributions.

    Full technical papers are expected to report on new research that makes a substantial technical contribution to the field.

    Short papers can report on new research or other issues of interest to the AI community. Examples of work suitable for short papers include: novel ideas that are not yet fully developed or whose scope is not large enough for a full paper; important implementation techniques; novel interesting benchmark problems; short experimental studies; interesting applications that are not yet completely solved or analyzed; position or challenge papers; etc.

    Conference submission is electronic in PDF via EasyChair:

    http://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ki2012

    Papers will be subject to blind peer review. All papers will be reviewed based on the standard criteria of relevance, significance of results, originality of ideas, soundness, and quality of the presentation.

    All accepted papers will be published in the main conference proceedings, and will be presented at the conference. At least one author of each accepted paper must register for the conference and present the contribution.

    Doctoral Consortium
    Call for Applications

    The German Conference on Artificial Intelligence traditionally brings together academic and industrial researchers from all areas of AI. The technical program of presentations, workshops, and tutorials is complemented by a doctoral consortium that invites participation by PhD students at any stage and from any subject area within AI.

    The goals of the doctoral consortium are
    • to provide PhD students with the opportunity to present their ongoing research and receive feedback from established researchers;
    • to promote networking among PhD students and AI researchers in general, both on a national and an international level;
    • to support students with advice on academic, research, and industrial careers.

    The doctoral consortium is implemented as a student mentoring program that introduces students to senior researchers in the relevant fields. Students accepted for the Doctoral Consortium will also participate in the main KI 2012 conference and are waived the registration fee.

    To apply for the KI 2012 doctoral consortium, please send the following documents by email to clu@uni-bremen.de:
    • An abstract of your thesis, formatted according to the KI guidelines, that describes the problem being addressed, the motivation for addressing the problem, the progress made to date, the proposed plan of further research, and related work. The abstract is limited to three pages.
    • A short CV (at most 2 pages) that covers background (name, university, supervisor), education (degree sought, year/status in degree, previous degrees), employment, and experience in research (publications, presentations, conferences attended).
    • Optionally, you can suggest potential mentors who could give you advice on technical aspects of your work and on your career.

    Important Dates

    Workshop and tutorial proposals deadline: March 15, 2012
    Workshop and tutorial proposals notification: April 1, 2012
    Full/short paper submission deadline: May 1, 2012 (abstract); May 4, 2012 (full/short paper)
    Notification (full/short paper): July 1, 2012
    Submission deadline for poster/demo, doctoral consortium, and workshop papers : July 9, 2012

    Deadline for camera ready copy (full/short paper): July 13, 2012
    Notification (poster, doctoral consortium, and workshop papers): August 31, 2012
    Conference: September 24-27, 2012

    Venue

    The main campus of Saarland University is situated in one of the many wooded areas surrounding Saarbrücken, the state capital of Saarland. Saarbrücken lies in the south-west of Germany, close to Luxembourg and the neighbouring French region of Lorraine.

    Traveling to Saarland University by car, train, bus, and plane

    By Car

    Via the A1 motorway from the north (Trier), via the A6 from the east (Kaiserslautern), via the A620 from Luxembourg and via the A4/E50 when approaching from either Metz/Paris or Strasbourg.

    By Train

    From the north-west via Koblenz/Trier (RegionalExpress departing every two hours); from the north-east via Mainz (RegionalExpress departing every hour); from the east via Mannheim (fast IC/ICE services several times a day, or hourly suburban (S-Bahn) or RegionalExpress services); from France via Metz or via Strasbourg/Saargemuines.

    By Bus

    To get from Saarbrücken Central Station (Hauptbahnhof) to the university campus in Saarbrücken, you can take bus number 102 (to "Dudweiler-Dudoplatz") or numbers 112 or 124 (to "Universität"). These services are operated by the Saarbahn+Bus company and run every 20 minutes. There are several bus stops on campus: "Universität Campus" (for campus zones A, B and C), "Universität Botanischer Garten" (for the science park or the university library), "Universität Mensa" (for campus zones C, D and E, and for the institutes INM, DFKI and MPI) and "Universität Busterminal" (for the institutes IZFP and KIST). For KI 2012, "Universität Mensa" is most convenient. Get a bus (Saarbrücken Hbf <-> Uni Mensa).

    By Plane

    Saarbrücken-Ensheim airport is located approximately 15 km from Saarbrücken city centre. There are scheduled flights to Berlin, Hamburg, Leipzig, Munich and Luxembourg.

    From the airport you can take a taxi to Saarbrücken. The travel time is about 20 minutes and the price should be about 25 Euro. You can take the bus as well which usually takes about 30 minutes and costs 2.40EUR. Take line R10 to the center (about one bus per hour). For exact times use the VGS Route Planner.

    Other airports in the region:

    • Luxemburg: 100 km, daily bus shuttle from main train station,
    • Frankfurt/Main: 170 km, extensive national rail service
    • Frankfurt/Hahn: 110 km (daily bus shuttle service to Frankfurt Hahn train station and Idar Oberstein train station, continuing the journey by train)
    • Zweibrücken: 50 km (daily bus shuttle service from main train station, number 199)

    About Saarbrücken

    The state capital of Saarbrücken is the regional centre of the Saarland and is situated at the heart of the Saar-Lor-Lux region. The city has approximately 180.000 inhabitants and is strongly influenced by its proximity to France and the chequered history of a French-German border town. The university, trade fair and conference city is set amidst vast woods and enchants visitors with its French charm, which is reflected in the narrow alleys at the foot of the castle and in the pedestrian precinct at the St. Johanner Market Square. Saarbrücken is currently evolving from a stagnant mining town to a vibrant centre of service, science, research and modern technology.
    Saarland University is a modern university within the Saar-Lor-Lux region. An international perspective has been a defining feature of Saarland University ever since it was established in cooperation with France in 1948. Today, 17.000 young people are studying in Saarbrücken and Homburg (Faculty of Medicine), 15 per cent of whom are international students. Located in a pleasant woodland setting, the university campus offers students and researchers a broad range of sporting and cultural activities, which together with the numerous cafés and restaurants make the campus an ideal place to relax between lectures or after work. And thanks to the high-speed ICE train link it takes only two hours to travel from Paris to Saarbrücken.

    Saarbrücken Computer Science welcomes you!

    Saarbrücken is an international research-oriented center for computer science. Researchers at Saarland University cooperate closely with the Max Planck Institute for Informatics, the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems, the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), the Center for Bioinformatics and the Visual Computing Institute. These internationally renowned research institutes are co-located on the Saarbrücken University Campus, neighbours to the Computer Science Department with its 19 chairs and the Computational Linguistics department with its 9 chairs. All in all, more than 500 researchers in Computer Science have made their academic home in Saarbrücken. Many work on common projects funded by the German Government, the European Union or industrial partners. In October 2007, Saarbrücken Computer Science was awarded two major grants in the framework of the Initiative for Excellence of the German federal and state governments: the Cluster of Excellence on Multimodal Computing and Interaction and funding for the Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science, which will help us continue to build and secure our international scientific and academic standing. Researchers of Computer Science Research in Saarbrücken have won six Leibniz Prizes, the highest German research award. Saarbrücken is furtheron the only Campus with three Karl Heinz Beckurts awards, four Konrad Zuse awards and the only German Future Prize awarded to a researcher in Computer Science. The German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, with sites in Kaiserslautern, Saarbrücken, Bremen (with an associated branch in Osnabrück) and a project office in Berlin, is the leading German research institute in the field of innovative software technology. In the international scientific community, DFKI ranks among the most recognized "Centers of Excellence" and currently is the biggest research center worldwide in the area of Artificial Intelligence and its application in terms of number of employees and the volume of external funds.

    Uni Saarbrücken DFKI Schloss Saareck

    / Saarland University / DFKI / Schloss Saareck (Dinner)

    Accommodation

    Hotels in Saarbrücken for every budget - find them here:


    Größere Kartenansicht

    Conference Organization

    • General Chair: Antonio Krüger (Saarland University and DFKI)
    • Program Chair: Birte Glimm (University of Ulm)
    • Local Chairs: Boris Brandherm (Saarland University) and Ralf Jung (Saarland University)
    • Workshop Chair: Gabriele Kern-Isberner (TU Dortmund)
    • Tutorial Chair: Wolfgang Maaß (Saarland University)
    • Poster and Demo Chair: Stefan Wölfl (University of Freiburg)
    • Doctorial Consortium Chair: Carsten Lutz (University of Bremen)
    • Publicity Chair: Daniel Sonntag (DFKI)

    Program Committee

    Klaus-Dieter Althoff, Tamim Asfour, Franz Baader, Amit Banerjee, Joscha Bach, Sven Behnke, Maren Bennewitz, Ralph Bergmann, Marc Cavazza, Eliseo Clementini, Cristobal Curio, Kerstin Dautenhahn, Frank Dylla, Stefan Edelkamp, Dominik Endres, Udo Frese, Stefan Funke, Johannes Fürnkranz, Christopher Geib, Birte Glimm, Björn Gottfried, Horst-Michael Gross, Jens-Steffen Gutmann, Martin Günther, Malte Helmert, Joachim Hertzberg, Otthein Herzog, Gabriele Kern-Isberner, Thomas Kirste, Alexander Kleiner, Roman Kontchakov, Oliver Kramer, Ralf Krestel, Torsten Kröger, Kai-Uwe Kühnberger, Bogdan Kwolek, Gerhard Lakemeyer, Tobias Lang, Volker Lohweg, Benedikt Löwe, Robert Mattmüller, Bernd Michaelis, Ralf Möller, Justus Piater, Felix Putze, Marco Ragni, Jochen Renz, Sebastian Rudolph, Jürgen Sauer, Bernd Schattenberg, Malte Schilling, Ute Schmid, Lutz Schröder, Carsten Schürmann, René Schumann, Jan-Georg Smaus, Luciano Spinello, Benjamin Satzger, Steffen Staab, Daniel Sonntag, Cyrill Stachniss, Ingo J. Timm, Rudolph Triebel, Johanna Völker, Toby Walsh, Thomas Wiemann, Stefan Wölfl, Diedrich Wolter

    Sponsors

    KI 2012 offers opportunities to get in touch with leading researchers in the field of Artificial Intelligence.


    To learn more about sponsoring opportunities, please contact

    Antonio Krüger or Daniel Sonntag.

    Download Conference Poster and Postcard

    Conference Poster ------ Info Postcard

    Contact

    General Chair

    Antonio Krüger
    DFKI, http://www.dfki.de/~krueger
    Stuhlsatzenhausweg 3, 66123 Saarbrücken
    Germany

    Phone: +49 681 85775 5006
    Fax: +49 681 85775 5007

    Publicity Chair / Website

    Daniel Sonntag
    DFKI, http://www.dfki.de/~sonntag
    Stuhlsatzenhausweg 3, 66123 Saarbrücken
    Germany

    Phone: +49 681 85775 5254
    Fax: +49 681 85775 5020